Whitlam Institute

What Matters 2019 Shortlist

What Matters 2019 Shortlist

The Tarkine

The Tarkine

Oliver Ware

Year 5, Sutherland Public School

Situated in Tasmania's north-west, The Tarkine covers around 4,500 square kilometres and the Forest Reserve is a huge area of temperate rainforest, sand dunes and coastal heathland with strong links to the Tasmanian Aboriginal people. Although the Savage River park close to it is a national park and the Franklin River is World Heritage listed, the Tarkine is not under any protection so the logging companies that want to tear it down get to do so gradually. The logging businesses provide the locals with a job but are tearing down a natural wonder.

 Another threat the Tarkine is facing is the diabolical open cut mining. Open cut mining is a surface mining technique of extracting rock or minerals from the earth by their removal from an open pit or borrow. This technique is very bad and harmful for the environment if not done properly. This is a huge problem because the plant and animal life there is as rich and varied as the many habitats that support them. Residents include the platypus,echidna, wombat, bandicoot, possum and glider - not to mention the famous Tasmanian devil.

 Biodiversity is another reason the Tarkine is a rainforest worth saving. Biodiversity means the variety of plant and animal life in the world or in a habitat, a high level of which is typically considered to be important. The Tarkine is of high importance is because all the trees capture carbon and release oxygen, so we can breathe and thrive. The Tarkine like all forests also mitigates long term climate change and its affects. The reason along with all my other examples the Tarkine is so important and crucial is because of its deep past and its future. It deeply connects with the locals because of them growing up around and in the Tarkine rainforest and it steadily growed into they heart. This awesome rainforest is incredibly important because of its beauty that is worth preserving for future generations. A few things we can do to preserve this natural beauty is to alert your local council of the outrage, try to be aware of your rubbish consumption and do not support any company that helps tear down this natural wonder.

 The Tarkine is important because of its beauty, its biodiversity, its production of capturing carbon, its past that is tied to the locals and that future generations should be able to experience this natural, awesome and wonderous beauty.