Whitlam Institute

Latest

Browse Latest

Gough Whitlam's vision of the Australian Res Publica: Creating civil possibility in rhetoric and action

Gough Whitlam was a master of rhetoric. Professor Yeatman explores the central importance of political rhetoric for creating civil possibility, for articulating and therefore continually creating institutions such as the parliament, the political party, the public sector and the federal system of government. 

Read More
Smoke and Thalidomide

Dr Edward Nik-Khah's Smoke and Thalidomide is an enthralling examination of the power of economists - and their constructed institutions - in the mobilisation of the US pharmaceutical industry in the 1970s, and their continued influence in how the industry controls our knowledge about drugs today.

Read More
Gough Whitlam’s Vision of Social Democracy

In Gough Whitlam’s Vision of Social Democracy: Parliament and Party, the Honourable Dr Barry Jones AC, takes you on a political expedition spanning several decades from the Whitlam years to present, exploring the international shift away from Social Democracy in the late 1970s through the modern ‘growth as consumption’ economic mindset that has resulted in investment in research, environmental protection or heritage being seen in negative terms.

Read More
Neoliberalism and the Crisis of Public Institutions

It is well-nigh impossible to understand contemporary Australia without an appreciation of the origins of neoliberalism, its emergence as the dominant political philosophy of the last thirty years and its institutional impact. These are matters of public interest that go well beyond any one political tradition.  

Read More
Gough Whitlam, Double J and the Youth Radio Revolution

Dr Liz Giuffre has trawled the archives to give us this refreshing cut on the genesis of Double J, in a way that not only captures something of the times and the place that Double J has come to hold in the lives of many hundreds of thousands of young Australians, but also stakes a claim for Double J’s enduring significance.

Read More
Contemporary Relevance, Comrade: Gough Whitlam in the 21st Century

The Whitlam Institute hosted this very special event at St Kilda Town Hall on the evening of Wednesday the 4th of March 2015. Gough's friend and confidant, the unsung hero of Australian public life, Graham Freudenberg AM delivered The Whitlam Institute's Commemorative Gough Whitlam Oration. Graham's chosen topic: Contemporary Relevance, Comrade: Gough Whitlam in the 21st Century. It was an extraordinary occasion.

Read More
All living things are diminished

In All living things are diminished: Breaking the national consensus on the environment, the Honourable Bob Debus AM, draws deeply from his knowledge and experience to distil a large body of historical material, policy precedent and political experience to argue that it is not only possible to seriously tackle the environmental issues that bedevil us but that our own experience over recent decades demonstrates what can be achieved.

Read More
Fossil Fuels, Global Warming and Democracy

In Fossil Fuels, Global Warming and Democracy: A Report from a Scene of the Collision, Dr Kevin Taft offers his account of the fraught interplay between ‘fossil fuels, global warming and democracy’ in his home province of Alberta, Canada. He writes as participant in and observer of a ‘collision’ between the climate change imperatives of cutting carbon emissions and the commercial imperatives being prosecuted by the fossil fuel industry.

Read More
Climate Change in a New Democratic Age

Dr Randal G Stewart, author of Climate Change in a New Democratic Age: Why we need more, not less, democratic participation, examines the role of three key groups in the climate change debate - scientists, economists, and the bureaucracy - as the lens through which to consider the capacity of democratic decision-making processes to establish effective climate change policy.

Read More
The Reward of Public Life is Public Progress

"Let me say finally to Mr Tony Whitlam who is here this evening on behalf of the Whitlam family: please pass on to the old man my warmest affection – nay, love – and convey to him, notwithstanding that my words here tonight could not do his public service proper justice, some sense of my belief that he is Australia's greatest white elder and friend without peer of Indigenous Australians."

Read More